Nailsea and Long Ashton path to Bristol opens after missing link complete

PUBLISHED: 16:59 04 May 2020 | UPDATED: 16:59 04 May 2020

The missing link at Ashton Court has been filled to complete the Nailsea and Long Ashton path to Bristol.Picture: Sustrans

The missing link at Ashton Court has been filled to complete the Nailsea and Long Ashton path to Bristol.Picture: Sustrans

Sustrans

A path which connects Nailsea to Bristol for cyclists and pedestrians has been completed after five years.

The missing link at Ashton Court has been filled to complete the Nailsea and Long Ashton path to Bristol.Picture: SustransThe missing link at Ashton Court has been filled to complete the Nailsea and Long Ashton path to Bristol.Picture: Sustrans

A long-awaited section of path at Ashton Court was finished earlier this month to complete the route.

Pedestrians and cyclists will now be able to walk or bike into Bristol from Nailsea and Long Ashton without using main roads, promoting safe travel in the district.

The path connects the gate to Ashton Court near Long Ashton Park and Ride with the UWE site at Kennel Lodge Road, avoiding the busy and steep hill leading up to Ashton Court Estate.

It crosses meadows and winds through a belt of woodland, stretching almost 800m.

The Ashton Court Greenway section of path was completed by organisation Greenways and charity Cycleroutes, which is founded by former Sustrans chief executive John Grimshaw and former trustee Caroline Levett, to build on Sustrans’ work on constructing the Nailsea to Bristol route.

John said: “It has been a long five years since we prepared the first drawings as part of Bristol’s Green Capital programme.

“Humphry Repton designed Ashton Park 200 years ago, and it has been a privilege to work in such a landscape and to create a path which is already so appreciated.

“We hope the path would have pleased him.”

The Ashton Court Greenway scheme was completed by 35 volunteers, contractors Safety Green, with funding from Veolia Community Trust, Sustrans and North Somerset Council, as well as support from Historic England, UWE and Bristol City Council, which own the land.

Sustrans director for the South of England, James Cleeton, said: “I’m genuinely excited to see this stretch of path open and being used by the public – it will make a real difference for people travelling into Bristol from North Somerset.

“It was a pleasure for Sustrans to be able to support the development of the route, both through funding and a considerable number of our staff volunteering their time and energy to finally complete this missing link.

“I congratulate John Grimshaw and his colleagues for their tenacity in bringing this route to life, and being the path is three metres wide, it offers a space to walk or cycle while respecting physical distancing measures.”


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