Husband and wife aim to cross Dartmoor at night and complete London Marathon

PUBLISHED: 11:12 03 April 2018

Karen Edgington and husband John Paul are organising a charity Dartmoor walk in April.

Karen Edgington and husband John Paul are organising a charity Dartmoor walk in April.

Archant

A night-time walk across Dartmoor and the London Marathon are among the fundraisers planned by a Portishead couple this month.

Karen Edgington and husband John Paul are organising a charity Dartmoor walk in April.Karen Edgington and husband John Paul are organising a charity Dartmoor walk in April.

John Paul (JP) and Karen Edgington, who live in Slade Road, are in for an action-packed month as they support the Anthony Nolan charity.

JP is one of seven people who on Saturday will set off across Dartmoor after dark.

The 30-mile trek needs to be completed by dawn on Sunday.

JP used to live on the edge of Dartmoor but crossing the moor after dark is a tough ask for anyone.

Karen Edgington and husband John Paul are organising a charity Dartmoor walk in April.Karen Edgington and husband John Paul are organising a charity Dartmoor walk in April.

Karen will support her husband but will not take part as she does not want to injure herself so close to the famous marathon.

The pair want to raise money for Anthony Nolan because her father John Willis died of an aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma on April 2, 2008. Together they want to raise close to £5,000.

Every day, Anthony Nolan matches people willing to donate their blood stem cells, or bone marrow, to people with blood cancer and disorders who desperately need life-saving transplants.

While Karen is a registered donor, she is keen to do more.

Karen said: “I’ve been on its register since 2006, but never been called up to donate my stem cells or bone marrow.

“I will stay on the register until I’m 60, so I’ve got another 20 years of possibly being a match for someone.

“Dad never got diagnosed in time. He never got the chance of treatment.

“We didn’t get to walk down the aisle together when I married my husband.

“He never met his incredible little granddaughters and never got to make them giggle until it hurt, like he did so often with me.

“But I now have the chance to help other people get the chance of treatment, of life. Of happy memories that haven’t yet been created.

“Dads, mums, brothers, sisters, grandparents, sons, daughters and grandchildren can get the chance of life.”

The Anthony Nolan charity was set up in 1974 by his mother Shirley, when her three-year-old son needed a bone marrow transplant.

To donate to the cause, visit https://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/KarenE

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